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Friday, June 24, 2011

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Great article, and very great points! I get so many newsletters from hotels and the like, and end up deleting them because they are not to the point, or there is so much text I begin to get a headache. Thanks for posting!

I especially liked the relevancy portion. Training the staff at the front desk to mark down whether the guests were a family of four or just a businessman would not take any training at all but the message I send a businessman would be very different than a family.

a well know hotel can provide a more reliable newsletters in which a customer may satisfy .Like in Hotel Las Vegas i've been receiving newsletter from them and i really appreciate because i can see that they are into me..and value me much ..they make extra effort such giving me freebies....

All good points Guillaume. I'd also add the importance of a very clear call to action. Some hotels get the first bits right, but then fail to tell the reader what to do next to get more information or make a booking. I know this is simialr to ensuring url's are correct, but sometimes it's not even clear that that's what to click on next... And particuarly if someone is reading this on a mobile device they may just want a phone number to call rather than trying to view a webpage.

Some of the best hotels too wiling to provide hotels newsletters in email inbox that give me some updates about their brand, their hotels development or simply their latest offers.
this is news which update me lot more for time being to create some usual information.

I'd say that sometimes you newsletters can provide too much information. The user has to be considered a busy person, with hundreds of emails in their inbox. I'd recommend just a few lines that tease the reader into clicking the link through to the hotel website. The email is cleaner, quicker to read, and also the hotel gets the reader onto the website quicker!

Short, sharp and snappy.. not too full of images and so big that you have to scroll down the page.

Great article with some very good tips here will hopefully be able to put this into practice when i start putting together an e-news letter myself once again thanks for sharing.

@Dominic - thank you for your input. And it is verified as my Gmail account remove the picture straight away and ask me for permission to load the picture

@John - thank you for sharing your own experience

@Luxury Hotels - great stuff. Let us know when your newsletter is up and running

@Joseph - agree but bear in mind that email with info@ could be blocked by your customer email provider. So it might be worth to open a more subtle one

These are all good points. The only one I would take exception to is number 6, regarding generic email addresses. We are a small hotel, with only one email address that is closely monitored by the manager and assistant manager, so there is little danger that a response from a potential customer would be lost.

These are extremely good tips. I'm a webmaster at a luxury hotel agency so all these are helpful since we're starting up our own newsletter. Thanks so much for posting this!

Those are good points and are mistakes we have made too when we send out newsletters. In fact, we once sent out a newsletter with the wrong link to our "book now" page.

I especially liked the relevancy portion. Training the staff at the front desk to mark down whether the guests were a family of four or just a businessman would not take any training at all but the message I send a businessman would be very different than a family.

Good points.

I'd also add avoid image-based emails. They're often used as a simple method of delivering a consistent design irrespective of the differences in rendering across email clients.

The image-based approach can cause issues for those who have images blocked (blank email), set off spam filters (that base their algorithms on HTML-to-text ratio) or accessibility for those visually impaired.

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  • Please note that the author's opinions published on this site are of his alone and do not necessarily reflect those of Guillaume's current employer. This site is neither sanctioned nor endorsed by Guillaume's current employer and is a personal effort and initiative by Guillaume Thevenot. All care but no responsibility is taken for errors and ommissions. All material on this site may be reproduced with permission of the author - Guillaume Thevenot and appropriate acknowledgement.

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